Resources for Parents, Guidance Counslers, and Student Athletes
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"Teens, Drugs, and Violence - A Special Report" From The Office of National Drug Control Policy Teens who use drugs are more likely to engage in violent behavior, steal, use other drugs, and join gangs. In the past year, youth* who used an illicit drug were almost twice as likely to have engaged in a violent behavior as those who did not use an illicit drug. And one in four teens (27%) who abused illicit drugs in the past year report attacking others with the intent to harm. Methamphetamine, marijuana, and prescription pain relievers are among the most abused drugs by teens who acted violently. The more drugs a teenager uses, the greater the tendency to engage in violent behavior. Nearly one in six teens (17%) who got into serious fights at school or work in the past year reported using drugs. Among those teens engaging in violent acts during the past year, most were 13, 14, and 15 years old. Please Click here to read more... 
NCAA INFORMATION NCAA Guide for the College-Bound Student-Athlete 2013- 2014 - Click Here. NCAA Eligibility Quick Refence Sheet - Click here. 
Steroids - a growing problem Background: Anabolic steroids are chemicals that are similar to the male sex hormone testosterone and are used by an increasing number of young people to enhance their muscle size. While anabolic steroids are quite successful at building muscle, they can damage many body organs, including the liver, kidneys, and heart. They may also trigger dependency in users, particularly when taken in the large doses that have been known to be used by many bodybuilders and athletes. Click here to read more... 
Suicide Prevention: School-Based Youth Suicide Prevention Guide, Developed by the University of South Florida in conjuction with Orange Ulster BOCES and the Orange County Department of Mental Health. Click Here for the Guide!
Eating Disorders - What Can you do? Understanding Eating Disorders Eating disorders are extremely complex psychological problems that are very closely associated with depression and low self- esteem. For a person with anorexia, bulimia, or binge eating disorder, the disorder serves a purpose in her/his life. Often, disordered eating is used as a means to mask other underlying issues, or to cope with personal problems that may be unrelated to their concerns about food and weight (i.e. trouble at school or work, relationship or family problems). For someone who feels very out of control, an eating disorder may seem like a viable means of gaining back some power or agency. In a culture that is obsessed with weight loss and idealizes thinness, it is not hard to imagine how certain psychologically vulnerable people may feel that losing weight is the answer to all of their problems. Unfortunately, the eating disorder will inevitably take over that person's life, dictating every minute detail of her/his day. Click here to read entire article...
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Concussions and their impact on our athletes:  Concussion Information Flyer - Click Here. The Athletic Directors of the OCIAA and the Orange-Ulster BOCES Office of Interscholastic Athletics offers the following link to a video regarding concussion awareness and specifically Second ImPACT Syndrome. We would like to thank ESPN for making this video available to the public. Please take a few minutes to take a look at this important video - It could save someone's life. Please Click here for the VIDEO. Here is another video about second Impact Syndrome - Click here. Heads-up Concussions in Youth Sports A concussion is a brain injury caused by a bump or blow to the head that can change the way your brain normally works. Even what seems to be a mild bump or blow to the head can be serious. As many as 3.8 million sports- and recreation-related concussions are estimated to occur in the United States each year. Click here to read more...  "Suicide Awareness: What to Look For" - Excerpts from Patrick M. D'Aliso Foundation Web Site - Please click here to go to the site for more information. "Suicide ranks as the THIRD leading cause of death for ages 15-24 and FOURTH for ages 10-14. Suicide is the SECOND leading cause of death for our college age youth as well as for ages 15 to 19, in many states." Signs of Concern: * Talking about suicide. * Making statements about feeling hopeless, helpless,or worthless. * A deepening depression. * Preoccupation with death. * Taking unnecessary risks or exhibiting self-destructive behavior. * Out of character behavior. * A loss of interest in the things one cares about. * Visiting or calling people one cares about. * Making arrangements, setting one’s affairs in order. * Giving prized possessions away .- Taken from Patrick M. D'Aliso Foundation Web Site - Please click here to go to the site for more information.